Week of February 20, 2017

 As temps continue to warm up more and more species are starting to be on the wing. While it is looking as if we aren't going to have any "real" winter this year, fear not for the butterflies if we do. There are evolutionary safeguards in place to ensure that no species gets compromised by a sudden freeze. Nectar sources now are pretty hard to find, but there are things like henbit, dandelions, etc. that are in bloom. Elbow bush is coming is starting to flower, as are some redbuds and a few Prunus species.

Many species are sexually dimorphic (males and females look differently). Click on the links below to see more information and photos.

SPREADWING SKIPPERS

GRASS SKIPPERS

SWALLOWTAILS

Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus p.philenor)

 

Eastern Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

 

Eastern Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)

 

SULPHURS AND WHITES

Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)

Southern Dogface (Zerene cesonia)

Sleepy Orange (Abaeis nicippe)

 

Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

 

Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAIRSTREAKS AND BLUES

BRUSHFOOTS

American Snout (Libytheana carinenta)

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

Painted Lady (Vanessa carudi)

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

 

Goatweed Leafwing (Anaea andria)

 

Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis)

 

Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma)

 

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes t. tharos)

     

 


Thanks to Roger Sanderson and Melanie Schuchart for reporting. Report your sightings.

Email Dale Clark